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Peter Dean - Radio

Peter Dean did not begin his singing career until he was 60 but he certainly had a fun time during his golden years. Born in 1911, he loved dancing to swing music. In 1938 he briefly led a band in New York that featured the then-unknown Dinah Shore. Dean spent his life in the music business but mostly behind the scenes, working as the manager for Dinah Shore, Paul Whiteman, Charlie Spivak and Peggy Lee. He also wrote music for jingles and television commercials. After he retired, he returned to his first love of singing, encouraged by his niece Carly Simon.


In the 1970s Peter Dean started singing regularly in New York clubs, performing good-humored and joyful rendition of vintage songs. He had an excellent voice and an infectious enthusiasm for the nostalgic tunes, recording two albums for Inner City. Radio followed Only Time Will Tell. Joined by such major musicians as pianist Dick Hyman, bassists Bob Haggart and Major Holley, Dick Meldonian on soprano, clarinetist Phil Bodner and (on two numbers) Carly Simon, Dean puts on a very entertaining show. He composed “Blues For The Ladies,” wrote updated lyrics to “Crazy Words, Crazy Tune,” and clearly had a great time singing such songs as “Radio,” ”Take Me To the Land Of Jazz” and “From Monday On.” Listeners will have a fun time too.

SKU: IC1163

Availability: In stock

$16.95

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Details

Details

Peter Dean did not begin his singing career until he was 60 but he certainly had a fun time during his golden years. Born in 1911, he loved dancing to swing music. In 1938 he briefly led a band in New York that featured the then-unknown Dinah Shore. Dean spent his life in the music business but mostly behind the scenes, working as the manager for Dinah Shore, Paul Whiteman, Charlie Spivak and Peggy Lee. He also wrote music for jingles and television commercials. After he retired, he returned to his first love of singing, encouraged by his niece Carly Simon. In the 1970s Peter Dean started singing regularly in New York clubs, performing good-humored and joyful rendition of vintage songs. He had an excellent voice and an infectious enthusiasm for the nostalgic tunes, recording two albums for Inner City. Radio followed Only Time Will Tell. Joined by such major musicians as pianist Dick Hyman, bassists Bob Haggart and Major Holley, Dick Meldonian on soprano, clarinetist Phil Bodner and (on two numbers) Carly Simon, Dean puts on a very entertaining show. He composed “Blues For The Ladies,” wrote updated lyrics to “Crazy Words, Crazy Tune,” and clearly had a great time singing such songs as “Radio,” ”Take Me To the Land Of Jazz” and “From Monday On.” Listeners will have a fun time too.

Additional Info

Additional Info

Format: Jazz Record
Soloist/Artist No
Instruments Music and Musicians
Composer No
Accompanist/ Conductor No
SKU IC1163

Reviews

Customer Reviews (2)

Wonderfully Entertaining Nostalgia!Review by Big Toots
Quality
Sometimes it’s a Woody Allen film or a “Broadway Empire”-type TV show period piece that uses it. At other times, it is a TV commercial that the ad agency hopes will get you humming and buying their bubbles in the detergent aisle. It’s that catchy 1930s-era ditty – maybe a novelty piece performed with oddball instrumentation such as kazoos, banjos, ukuleles, whistling and the like and which features a male singer who sounds as if he’s either using a megaphone (and probably is) or holding his nose (perhaps). It’s the stuff of Joe Franklin, “Memory Lane” and “Snake Hips” himself – Peter Dean.

Peter Dean, was a New York cabaret and nightclub vocalist who began his singing career at the young age of 60 after a successful career managing entertainment talent (including Peggy Lee, Charlie Spivak and Paul Whiteman) and writing lucrative commercial jingles.
With Radio he sends up a near-hour’s worth of musical fun, frivolity and innocent good-times. Not taking himself - but certainly the music - seriously, Dean, accompanied by various talented types (including Carly Simon!, Major Holley and Dick Hyman), sings and strums his uke through a dozen not-so-well-known selections that could easily be plugged in to that aforementioned movie, TV show or commercial (It’s a Beautiful Day,” “Crazy Words, Crazy Tune”). The album is a hoot.

Vocally, Dean is no uptempo Crosby (“From Monday On”) - or ‘phoned Vallee (“Radio”), for that matter. He is, however, a crooner on a mission to draw you in musically to a time when things were a little slower, a little goofier (“Blues for the Ladies”), and plenty of fun (“What Will I Do in the Morning”). He lets you feel as if you might be sitting around listening to this good-natured and easily-accessible material on a device that stirred imagination parading hits long before Netflix, Cable and even Gleason, Sullivan, and America’s “Bandstand” and “Talent.”

Radio is the purest nostalgia, a fun romp that might have you singing along and thinking “Why Can’t We Do It Again?” Why not? Tune in.
(Posted on 4/29/2015)
RadioReview by Simon Sez
Quality
Peter Dean was already 60 before he started to pursue his lifelong love of singing. Against all odds, he had a lot of success in his last 15 years, singing in New York clubs and recording two albums for Inner City.

Radio, his second record, has Dean and his friends (which include Dick Hyman, Phil Bodner and, on two songs, Dean’s niece Carly Simon) having a great time singing songs from the 1920s and ‘30s. Peter Dean had a strong and very friendly voice, and his enthusiasm is very catchy. Radio will make listeners smile.

Simon Sez: Peter Dean’s Radio (IC1163), his second album for Inner City, has him singing fun versions of songs from the 1920s and ‘30s.
(Posted on 5/6/2014)

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