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Blowin The Blues Away - The Bob Wilber Quintet featuring Clark Terry

Blowin' The Blues Away teams together three major artists in 1961, and it is full of surprises. Bob Wilber is best known as a soprano-saxophonist and clarinetist who developed his own voice in New Orleans jazz and swing combos. Dick Wellstood was one of the top stride pianists to emerge after World War II. And flugelhornist Clark Terry, who came to fame with Duke Ellington, was a superb and witty soloist for many decades.


On Blowin’ The Blues Away, Wilber is heard in his most modern style, playing clarinet and tenor somewhere between swing and bop. Wellstood is heard as a modern mainstream stylist who hints at both Horace Silver and Count Basie. In contrast, Terry is his usual joyous self, leading the quintet (which includes bassist George Duvivier and drummer Panama Francis) through nine different blues. In addition to the more modern than expected playing of Wilber and Wellstood, the music is surprising in the wide range that it covers. Included along the way are a traditional 12-bar blues, a ten-bar blues in 12/8 time, a blues ballad, a blues with a bridge, a Latin blues, and a cooking uptempo blues. Terry, Wilber and Wellstood are heard in inspired form and the results are quite infectious. 

SKU: CJ09

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Details

Details

After Midnight Please Blues Go On Away From Here Soulful Serenade Basie Eyes The Maryland Farmer Baptist Blues Where Will I Go La Valse Bleue (The Blue Waltz Blue Rhumba

Additional Info

Additional Info

Format: Jazz Record
Soloist/Artist No
Instruments Music and Musicians
Composer No
Accompanist/ Conductor No
SKU CJ09

Reviews

Customer Reviews (4)

The Bob Wilber Quintet – featuring Clark Terry “Blowin’ the Blues Away”Review by Big Toots
Quality
Trumpeter Clark Terry, who sadly passed away earlier this year at 94, once did an album titled The Happy Horns of Clark Terry (Impulse, 1964). It was probably the most appropriately titled jazz album ever. With Blowin’ the Blues Away, Terry takes his supremely joyous hornspersonality (they were one, you know) and joins forces with woodwind legend, Bob Wilber and an all-world rhythm section (Dick Wellstood, George Duvivier and Panama Francis) to prescribe a cure-all for the blues and whatever else ails ya. No snake oil, folks. This is the real deal.

Offering nine marvelously catchy bluesy originals of neatly distinct but infectious grooves – Gospel, Funk, Boogaloo, et al - Wilber and Terry and their rhythm crew are absolutely joyous in this session which was originally recorded in 1961. Wilber (who now resides in the United Kingdom) is legendary as a clarinet and saxophone virtuoso and he demos and validates why here. Although acknowledged as more of a mainstream interpreter, Wilber can swing with the best of them. Here he stretches out, venturing into the Bop domain with solos that excite and stir (“Please Blues Go on Away from Here”). Terry, arguably one of the greatest trumpet stylists, if not trumpet players, of all time, brings virtuosity, humor and soul (“Soulful Serenade,” “Baptist Blues”) to both the melodies as well as his marvelous solo flights. Together frontliners Wilber and Terry take the lead here swinging as if they’re joined at the hip – and they are very (After Midnight,” “Blue Rhumba”). Pianist Wellstood, as versatile a keyboardist as there ever was – he excelled playing stride, Bop and mainstream, you name it - comps cool and solos superbly (“Basie Eyes”). Duvivier and Francis are the perfect partners in time, driving the bus with precision and a very heavy sense of swing (“The Maryland Farmer,” “Blue Rhumba”).

You get the immediate sense from listening to Blowin’ the Blues Away that the recording session was an absolute funfest. How could it not be with this gregarious aggregation? Why even the fly blown off the wall flew off happy. (Posted on 4/29/2015)
Just What the MD Ordered!Review by Big Toots
Quality
Trumpeter Clark Terry, who sadly passed away earlier this year at 94, once did an album titled The Happy Horns of Clark Terry (Impulse, 1964). It was probably the most appropriately titled jazz album ever. With Blowin’ the Blues Away, Terry takes his supremely joyous hornspersonality (they were one, you know) and joins forces with woodwind legend, Bob Wilber and an all-world rhythm section (Dick Wellstood, George Duvivier and Panama Francis) to prescribe a cure-all for the blues and whatever else ails ya. No snake oil, folks. This is the real deal.
Offering nine marvelously catchy bluesy originals of neatly distinct but infectious grooves – Gospel, Funk, Boogaloo, et al - Wilber and Terry and their rhythm crew are absolutely joyous in this session which was originally recorded in 1961. Wilber (who now resides in the United Kingdom) is legendary as a clarinet and saxophone virtuoso and he demos and validates why here. Although acknowledged as more of a mainstream interpreter, Wilber can swing with the best of them. Here he stretches out, venturing into the Bop domain with solos that excite and stir (“Please Blues Go on Away from Here”). Terry, arguably one of the greatest trumpet stylists, if not trumpet players, of all time, brings virtuosity, humor and soul (“Soulful Serenade,” “Baptist Blues”) to both the melodies as well as his marvelous solo flights. Together frontliners Wilber and Terry take the lead here swinging as if they’re joined at the hip – and they are very (After Midnight,” “Blue Rhumba”). Pianist Wellstood, as versatile a keyboardist as there ever was – he excelled playing stride, Bop and mainstream, you name it - comps cool and solos superbly (“Basie Eyes”). Duvivier and Francis are the perfect partners in time, driving the bus with precision and a very heavy sense of swing (“The Maryland Farmer,” “Blue Rhumba”).
You get the immediate sense from listening to Blowin’ the Blues Away that the recording session was an absolute funfest. How could it not be with this gregarious aggregation? Why even the fly blown off the wall flew off happy.
(Posted on 4/24/2015)
Bob Wilber / Clark TerryReview by Simon Sez
Quality
Bob Wilber and Clark Terry play nine different blues on Blowin’ The Blues Away but they never give listeners the blues. This may have been the few times that they ever recorded together but their playing is quite happy, as if they had just discovered how great they both were. Both Wilber and Terry came from swing (and in Wilber’s case also New Orleans jazz) but they could also play very credible bebop.
The thought of hearing nine straight blues may seem a bit tiresome to some but this music (which also has some wonderful piano playing from Dick Wellstood) includes a lot of variety with each song having its own approach and personality. It covers all types of moods and rhythms and has some hot performances.

Simon Sez: On Blowin’ The Blues Away (CJ09), Bob Wilber and Clark Terry play blues without giving listeners the blues.
(Posted on 5/6/2014)
Review by Scott Yanow
Quality
Wilbur and the always-jubilant Terry bring out the best in each other during this joyful album. The joyous spirit of the players makes this unique get-together especially memorable. (Posted on 6/12/2013)

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