Welcome!

Sidney Bechet & Martial Solal - When A Soprano Meets a Piano

In 1923, soprano-saxophonist Sidney Bechet became the first great jazz horn soloist to emerge on records. A jazz pioneer who was born in New Orleans in 1897, Bechet evolved from being a child prodigy to becoming the star soloist with Will Marion Cook’s orchestra during a European tour. A contemporary of Louis Armstrong, Bechet spent much of 1925-31 traveling the world. He had a hit recording of “Summertime” in 1938 and during the New Orleans revival of the 1940s, he gained fame as a stirring soloist and a superb ensemble player. His last decade (1949-59) was mostly spent living in France where he was a household name and a national celebrity. Martial Solal, who was 30 years younger, was originally a bop pianist whose playing became more original and adventurous through the years.


Bechet and Solal may have seemed like a musical odd couple, but on this 1957 quartet recording they find a great deal of common ground performing sophisticated swing standards. Bechet sounds inspired by the fresh material and Solal modifies his style a little to fit in comfortably in this format. On songs such as “Exactly Like You,” “Jeepers Creepers,” “All The Things You Are” and “Pennies From Heaven,” Sidney Bechet and Martial Solal create happy and swinging music together.

SKU: IC7008

Availability: In stock

$16.95

If your order is placed before 3:30pm New York Time, this item will ship today! Read more...

Call us now for more info about our products. 914-592-1188

Buy this product and earn special loyalty points!

Details

Details

I Only Have Eyes For You The Man I Love Exactly Like You These Foolish Things Once In A While Jeepers Creepers I Never Knew All the Things You Are All of Me Embraceable You Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams Rose Room It Don't Mean A Thing Pennies From Heaven

Additional Info

Additional Info

Format: Jazz Record
Soloist/Artist Sidney Bechet
Instruments Music and Musicians
Composer No
Accompanist/ Conductor Lloyd Thompson, Al Levitt, and Kenny Clarke
SKU IC7008

Reviews

Customer Reviews (3)

"Sidney Sublime"Review by Big Toots
Quality
IC 7008 When a Soprano Meets a Piano Sidney Bechet/Martial Solal

Sidney Bechet was a fire-breathing powerhouse of a soprano saxophonist. Shyness and reservation simply did not enter into Bechet’s performance vocabulary. Here (at 60 years young) with French pianist Martial Solal (29 years old), the Master himself steamrolls through two 7-selection Paris sessions. And, steamrolls is the indeed the operative description as Bechet and team –with one track’s exception – covered all of the predominantly GAS material in single takes.

Now, before one presumes that there was a need for speed here or studio time constraints, take a listen. Every cut here is a gem with Bechet’s soprano belting out melody and melody-infused solos with a force that is pure intensity, as well as exhibiting a youthful, playful charm (“I Only Have Eyes for You,” Jeepers Creepers,” “Pennies from Heaven”). Bechet, at this stage of his illustrious career, certainly had nothing to prove. He could have easily have “phoned in” the session, especially on selections that were well in his repertoire. Modern ears might be taken aback at Bechet’s wide vibrato and huge sound, but, the New Orleans old-timers such as Bechet (and Armstrong, for that matter) knew to blow – and Bechet does from note one to the last. Even the slower balladic material is bursting with Bechet’s muscular approach (“The Man I Love,” “These Foolish Thing,” “Embraceable You”).

The French-Algerian Solal, while co-billed here with Sidney, is more part of the rhythm section, as opposed to a co-leading playing partner. He’s a fine pianist with a European sense of swing that is, understandably, not anywhere near as potent as Bechet’s. Both rhythm sections provide adequate support for Bechet’s limelight.

“When a Soprano Meets a Piano” is a brilliant 14-tune portrait of one of jazz’s true icons worthy of a place in a musical Louvre.
(Posted on 6/11/2015)
Sydney Bechet & Martial SolalReview by Simon Sez
Quality
We all know Sidney Bechet, or think we do. He always played New Orleans jazz, loved to dominate ensembles with his soprano (scaring off many trumpeters), and was a fiery player who did not advance with the times. That all seemed right because why play bebop when you can play like Sidney Bechet? No one was ever going to steal the show from him, not with that vibrato, powerful sound and explosive personality.
In the late 1950s when this album first came out, many in the jazz world must have been scratching their heads. Not only is Bechet heard playing with the quirky modern pianist Martial Solal but the soprano saxophonist digs into “All The Things You Are,” “Exactly Like You” and other songs that one wouldn’t associate with New Orleans jazz. And just as odd is the opportunity to hear Solal sounding right at home playing swing tunes. But perhaps the oddest thing is that many listeners, including myself, too often pigeonhole great musicians, believing that these artists can only play one way throughout their careers. Both Sidney Bechet and Martial Solal do just fine on this unexpected album, and so does the listener.

Simon Sez: Sidney Bechet and Martial Solal together? Surprise! They make an excellent team on When A Soprano Meets A Piano (IC7008).
(Posted on 5/6/2014)
Sydney BechetReview by Simon Sez
Quality
We all know Sidney Bechet, or think we do. He always played New Orleans jazz, loved to dominate ensembles with his soprano (scaring off many trumpeters), and was a fiery player who did not advance with the times. That all seemed right because why play bebop when you can play like Sidney Bechet? No one was ever going to steal the show from him, not with that vibrato, powerful sound and explosive personality.
In the late 1950s when this album first came out, many in the jazz world must have been scratching their heads. Not only is Bechet heard playing with the quirky modern pianist Martial Solal but the soprano saxophonist digs into “All The Things You Are,” “Exactly Like You” and other songs that one wouldn’t associate with New Orleans jazz. And just as odd is the opportunity to hear Solal sounding right at home playing swing tunes. But perhaps the oddest thing is that many listeners, including myself, too often pigeonhole great musicians, believing that these artists can only play one way throughout their careers. Both Sidney Bechet and Martial Solal do just fine on this unexpected album, and so does the listener.

Simon Sez: Sidney Bechet and Martial Solal together? Surprise! They make an excellent team on When A Soprano Meets A Piano (IC7008).
(Posted on 5/6/2014)

Write Your Own Review

You're reviewing: Sidney Bechet & Martial Solal - When A Soprano Meets a Piano

How do you rate this product? *

  1 star 2 stars 3 stars 4 stars 5 stars
Quality

Tags

Tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

%s1 / %s2