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Genesis - Charles Sullivan

Charles Sullivan has always been highly regarded by his peers if a bit obscure to the general jazz-listening public. He started playing around New York City in 1966, and worked with a diverse collection of leaders including Sy Oliver, the Collective Black Artists, Lionel Hampton, the Jazz Composer's Workshop, and Count Basie, as well as working the pit bands of several Broadway shows.


This 1976 album, available for the first time on CD, was his first release as a leader using his own material. He is joined by a number of excellent musicians, including Alex Black on bass, Sonny Fortune on alto sax, Dee Dee Bridgewater on vocals, Billy Hart on drums, Stanley Cowell on piano, and others. This is a long overdue release, and one no jazz fan will want to miss.

SKU: IC1012

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Details

Details

Evening Song Good-bye Sweet John (in memory of John Foster) Field Holler Now I'll Sleep Genesis

Additional Info

Additional Info

Format: Jazz Record
Soloist/Artist Charles Sullivan
Instruments Music and Musicians
Composer No
Accompanist/ Conductor Alex Black on bass, Sonny Fortune on alto sax, Dee Dee Bridgewater on vocals, Billy Hart on drums, Stanley Cowell on piano, and others.
SKU IC1012

Reviews

Customer Reviews (5)

"An Artist and Recording Definitely Worth Hearing!"Review by Big Toots
Quality
IC 1012 Genesis Charles Sullivan

Trumpeter Charles Sullivan (who now goes under the name Kamau Muata Adilifu) is one of a handful, perhaps two handfuls of trumpeters that have everything going for them except notoriety. That’s truly sad because Sullivan, like a Dizzy Reece, Wilbur Harden or Bill Hardman from an earlier era, is a marvelously gifted trumpet artist. And that artistry is expressed in great emotional depth and grandeur in “Genesis,” Sullivan’s debut recording as a leader. And, it is a winner.

From the very first notes – an octave jump – in the intro to the Latinesque burner, “Evening Song,” one can tell that this is a trumpeter of significant talent and vision.
Sullivan is an extraordinary player and definitely carries the jazz goods – a robust and gorgeous sound (“Good-bye Sweet John”), classically-trained technique, chops, range, and a flair for the fiery (and funky). Like those who overshadowed him, Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw (with whom Sullivan worked) Sullivan is a post Hard Bopper who doesn’t eschew his blue roots. Sullivan also can plumb emotion on slower fare. His duo take with pianist Onaje Allen Gumbs on the aforementioned ballad “Good-bye Sweet John” is almost classically rendered and is stunningly beautiful. Gumbs shines on the selection, by the way.

Sullivan composed all five selections on the album. As a writer, he delivers melodic platforms which are relatively easy to comprehend and that generate both beauty (the elegy “Good-bye Sweet John” and “Now I’ll Sleep,” a Strayhornesque take which is elegantly delivered by the great Dee Dee Bridgewater) and the high-energy excitement that launches his incredibly inventive solos and those of the fellow musicians here (“Field Holler”). That cut is a rocking call-and-response pressure cooker. The rhythm section on it steams. The title cut is an extended one which takes off on fire and explodes from there. Sullivan and altoist, Sonny Fortune blow the muscular melody and all Hell breaks loose.

“Genesis” is a superior debut effort by a truly extraordinary artist. Perhaps with this recording Sullivan (Adilifu) will get a closer listen and greater buzz. He has certainly earned and deserved it from this.

(Posted on 5/16/2015)
Charles SullivanReview by Simon Sez
Quality
Few of us may have heard of Charles Sullivan, but he was an excellent trumpeter 30 years ago and is still around today. I remember that he played with Mingus and Yusef Lateef, and they didn’t play with just anyone. He didn’t record much as a leader which makes Genesis pretty valuable.
From 1974, this record also features Stanley Cowell, Sonny Fortune and Dee Dee Bridgewater (at the beginning of her career). The music is adventurous, especially a long version of “Genesis” that must have originally taken up the whole side of an Lp. Charles Sullivan plays very good throughout this set and this may very well be his greatest album.

Simon Sez: Charles Sullivan’s Genesis (IC1012) is probably the trumpeter’s greatest recording featuring adventurous jazz with well-known sidemen.
(Posted on 5/6/2014)
Review by DownBeat Magazine
Quality
Quality
DownBeat Magazine: 5 Star Review "Charles Sullivan deserves full honors for this lyrical debut album... Sullivan has created a satisfying aural experience, an acoustic set electrified with feeling, alternating blue and brightly burning." (Posted on 6/14/2013)
Review by ~ Michael G. Nastos
Quality
This recording received a five-star rating in Down Beat magazine, and while there are too few Charles Sullivan recordings in the marketplace, it's well deserving of this accolade as one of the very best post-bop efforts of its decade, and now available on CD. (Posted on 6/14/2013)
Review by Mike L. - New York
Quality
This 1976 album, available for the first time on CD, was his first release as a leader using his own material. He is joined by a number of excellent musicians, including Alex Black on bass, Sonny Fortune on alto sax, Dee Dee Bridgewater on vocals, Billy Hart on drums, Stanley Cowell on piano, and others. This is a long overdue release, and one no jazz fan will want to miss. (Posted on 6/14/2013)

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