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Ernie Krivda & Friends - Satanic

When Ernie Krivda made his debut with Satanic in 1977, it was one of the most dazzling first efforts by any jazz musician in quite a few years. The opening nearly 14-minute "Three Legged Dance" introduced a young tenor-saxophonist who displayed intensity, passion, an original sound, and ideas that built and built upon each other, all in 13/8 time! Born in Cleveland in 1945, Krivda started out on the clarinet, switching to alto sax while in high school before settling on the tenor. He worked with the Jimmy Dorsey ghost band for a few months in 1964 and playing music in a variety of settings, mostly in the Cleveland area and often with commercial dance bands. Krivda co-led a quintet with pianist Bill Dobbins for much of 1969-72, was in a trio with the legendary guitarist Bill DeArango, and worked in Los Angeles with the Quincy Jones Orchestra.


In 1976, Krivda moved to New York to test the waters. Within six months he had made his first record for Inner City. His string of Inner City recordings gained him some recognition and, although he moved back to Cleveland in 1979, he has kept a steady profile through the years, recording regularly and always performing stimulating music. He still sounds unlike any other saxophonist. Satanic matches Krivda with keyboardist Gil Goldstein, bassist Jeff Berlin, drummer Bob Moses and Ray Mantilla on congas.


While "Three Legged Dance" is a somewhat startling beginning to the album, the other selections are quite worthy too. Krivda proves to be quite effective on soprano and flute in addition to tenor, playing two songs apiece on each instrument and displaying distinctive sounds on all of his horns. His music (he contributed all six pieces), while hinting at the avant-garde, also has the flavor of World Music, fusion and hard bop. The climax is the closing "La Festival" which is quite explosive and could hold its own with the most fiery solos of Michael Brecker and Ernie Watts. Satanic is still one of the greatest recordings of Ernie Krivda, demonstrating that he started off his solo career very much on top.

SKU: IC1031

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Details

Details

When Ernie Krivda made his debut with Satanic in 1977, it was one of the most dazzling first efforts by any jazz musician in quite a few years. The opening nearly 14-minute ÌøåÀå_Three Legged DanceÌøåÀå_ introduced a young tenor-saxophonist who displayed intensity, passion, an original sound, and ideas that built and built upon each other, all in 13/8 time! Born in Cleveland in 1945, Krivda started out on the clarinet, switching to alto sax while in high school before settling on the tenor. He worked with the Jimmy Dorsey ghost band for a few months in 1964 and playing music in a variety of settings, mostly in the Cleveland area and often with commercial dance bands. Krivda co-led a quintet with pianist Bill Dobbins for much of 1969-72, was in a trio with the legendary guitarist Bill DeArango, and worked in Los Angeles with the Quincy Jones Orchestra. In 1976, Krivda moved to New York to test the waters. Within six months he had made his first record for Inner City. His string of Inner City recordings gained him some recognition and, although he moved back to Cleveland in 1979, he has kept a steady profile through the years, recording regularly and always performing stimulating music. He still sounds unlike any other saxophonist. Satanic matches Krivda with keyboardist Gil Goldstein, bassist Jeff Berlin, drummer Bob Moses and Ray Mantilla on congas. While ÌøåÀå_Three Legged DanceÌøåÀå_ is a somewhat startling beginning to the album, the other selections are quite worthy too. Krivda proves to be quite effective on soprano and flute in addition to tenor, playing two songs apiece on each instrument and displaying distinctive sounds on all of his horns. His music (he contributed all six pieces), while hinting at the avant-garde, also has the flavor of World Music, fusion and hard bop. The climax is the closing ÌøåÀå_La FestivalÌøåÀå_ which is quite explosive and could hold its own with the most fiery solos of Michael Brecker and Ernie Watts. Satanic is still one of the greatest recordings of Ernie Krivda, demonstrating that he started off his solo career very much on top.

Additional Info

Additional Info

Format: Jazz Record
Soloist/Artist Ernie Krivda
Instruments Music and Musicians
Composer No
Accompanist/ Conductor keyboardist Gil Goldstein, bassist Jeff Berlin, drummer Bob Moses and congas Ray Mantilla
SKU IC1031

Reviews

Customer Reviews (2)

"Stunningly Satanic!"Review by Big Toots
Quality
IC 1031 Satanic Ernie Krivda

If there’s one – of many marvelous musical attributes of woodwind artist Ernie Krivda – it is that his tenor saxophone sound is so powerful and muscular, yet simultaneously so inviting and, in an odd way, childlike. His is a virile sound experience that is ideal when integrated with hyper-intense, almost aboriginal rhythmic bases, as are present on selected tracks of this exciting late 1970s recording.

Krivda, of Hungarian and Sicilian ethnic and musical heritage, is well-known and respected among fellow saxophonists worldwide. Musically, he has a deep affection for exploring textures that derive from ethnic musical sources. And, he also has the innate ability to take those textures and convert and perform them in such a way that, exotic as they might be, sound as “natural” and removed from novelty as anything from the Real Book. That ability takes perspicacity and genius to ID a musical nugget, pan it and mold it into the auric stuff that’s presented here.

“Satanic” is Krivda at his creative and enticing best. Exploring odd meters (13/8 on the extended “Three-Legged Dance”) and musical fabrics (20-measure-structured format on “Munchkin), his efforts are magnetic. He’s all out – without necessarily being “outside” - on these intense, highly rhythmic platforms. Not a squealer or squeaker and relying exclusively on his chops, Krivda knows what he’s working with and brings biting, razor-sharp tonalities into the ring against the wildly pounding percussion below. Take “Munchkin” for example, where bassist Jeff Berlin and percussion whiz, Ray Mantilla join Krivda in a bizarre, tornado of a tangle. It’s a highlight of the entire session. Krivda’s soprano and voice-augmented flute dive deeply into the exotic and intoxicating tracks “Song of the Moor” and “The Piper.” “La Festival”’s off-the-metronome tempo is beyond comprehension, if not belief. With Krivda incredibly in unison with Jeff Berlin’s bass, they take off speed-of-light like a freight train on a hallucinogen.
The brilliance of this album is also a function of the superior rhythm section – and dimension - behind Krivda: Gil Goldstein’s piano, Jeff Berlin’s bass and Bob Moses and Ray Mantilla on percussion.

“Satanic” is a six-track stun gun and Krivda is an ideal slinger. Let him and his gang get the draw on you.
(Posted on 6/14/2015)
SatanicReview by Simon Sez
Quality
Ernie Krivda’s debut recording is not exactly “satanic” but it certainly has its “devilish” moments. It must have been really devilish to play this way, for Krivda starts off with the 14-minute Three Legged Dance” in 13/8 time, a crazy way to launch one’s career.

Luckily the tenor-saxophonist was up to the task, not only playing with brilliance but in his own unusual style. He is adventurous, uses a unique staccato phrasing, and on other songs shows that he is also great on soprano and flute. Listen to excited he becomes during his playing on “La Festival.” It is strange that Krivda has not become more famous, but it was his choice to return to Cleveland after making his Inner City recordings.

Simon Sez: Few saxophonists have made as stunning a debut as Ernie Krivda did on Satanic (IC1031) in 1977. Brilliant! (Posted on 5/6/2014)

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